Sea Science

Social Sand Tiger Sharks

Wednesday, 11 January 2017 22:24

By Tanya Houppermans

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Image by Tanya Houppermans

Although the image of the shark as a solitary predator may pervade the public consciousness, new research is showing that at least one shark species exhibits complex social behaviors normally associated with higher order mammals. A team of University of Delaware scientists led by PhD candidate Danielle Haulsee has been using technology to study sand tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus) along the east coast of the United States. Sand tigers are ferocious-looking, but quite docile, sharks that inhabit warm, coastal regions throughout the world (with the exception of the eastern Pacific). As a result of their study, Haulsee and her colleagues are showing that sand tigers may have a much more enriching social life than we ever could have imagined.

Conservation

Shark Story: How a Tiger Touched my Heart

Monday, 28 March 2016 17:52

By Vanessa Mignon

As I look at the dozens of shark fins breaking the surface, I cannot help thinking about my mum’s face if she could see what I am about to do. Here I am, in the Bahamas, getting ready to jump in the middle of sharks!

I gear up, thinking about the crew’s advice; when you get in the water, go straight to the bottom. There is no cage and no protection, just my camera and the hope that I am too skinny to be even considered as finger food! My heart is full of excitement and anticipation.

Lifestyle

Perspective of a Young Environmentalist

Friday, 16 December 2016 13:58

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By Lilly Tougas (OGX Youth Field Journalist)

"You're never too young to make a difference" is an idea that pops up frequently these days. Kids seem to be much more empowered than ever to do just that. My brother and I are a pair of those kids. I am only 15-years-old and have been doing ocean conservation work since age four and my brother Trent, who is eleven, can't even remember a time in his life that didn't revolve around helping the planet.

Travel

Muck Diving 101: Lembeh

Thursday, 12 January 2017 18:18

By Sarah Wormald

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Photo by Sascha Janson at Lembeh Resort

Less than 30% of our planet is made up of land so as divers, we are privileged to be able to explore some of the other 70%. Not all of our oceans are bordered by coral reefs, but some excellent diving and stunning marine life can be found in areas where you would least expect it.

The term “muck” in muck diving takes its name from the sediment that lies on the bottom of many dive sites which can be a mixture of sand, silt, natural debris such as dead corals and coral rubble, or manmade debris ranging from tires and paint cans to air conditioning units and beer bottles – anything is possible. One thing is for sure, be careful how you move your fins or you could kick up a (silt) storm!

Photography

Mok Wai Hoe

Monday, 03 October 2016 02:11

OGX Emerging Pro Wildlife Photographer

- A pair of spotted dolphins darted beneath me while I was snorkelling in the pristine waters of the Bahamas

Wai Hoe started taking interest in wildlife photography in 2011. He has since received the OG Pictures of the Year Photo-Journalist award as well as the Wyland Master of Competition Award. His images and essays have appeared in Ocean Geographic, and he has also been recently inducted to the Ocean Artists Society with peers such as David Doubilet, James Cameron, Ernie Brooks, Stephen Frink and Michael AW.

Besides pursuing his passion in wildlife photography, Mok is also the Executive Director of an industrial electrical engineering company. He has a background in Marketing and Management, with a PhD in Business.

See more of his work at Natures Palette - www.mokwaihoe.com

Equipment

“Bubbles Away”- Oceanic Omega 3 Review

Thursday, 22 September 2016 02:37

By Brett Lobwein

 

The Oceanic Omega 3 side exhaust regulator is the perfect choice for underwater photographers, videographers or SCUBA divers who want to avoid any distraction from focusing on the ocean. Apart from the exhaust [flow] bubbles being directed away from my face, as a photographer I really like the Omega 3’s profile. Being a side exhaust means there is not a bulky regulator pushing up against the back of the camera housing as you look through the viewfinder.

The biggest ‘upgrade” of the Omega 3 over the very popular Omega 2 is that it no longer breathes wet. It comes packaged out of the box with a MaxFlex hose* and a ball swivel, making it very comfortable plus dramatically reducing the regulator pulling against your jaw. Tech divers will also love that this regulator is ambidextrous “no up or down”, making it an ideal choice for a side mount setup.

I have managed to test the Omega 3 to a depth of 52 metres (170 feet). The entire way from the surface to 52 metres the Omega 3 delivered the perfect amount of air without the need for any complicated adjustment knobs. A simple twist operated dive/pre-dive switch is very handy to stop any free flowing on the surface.

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Oceanic has paired the Omega 3 with the lightweight and top-performing FDX-i first stage. For those who want to explore colder oceanic waters, the FDX-i is ready with an environmentally sealed diaphragm. As you would expect this first stage is also balanced, which ensures the regulator performs consistently at any depth. I have also been very impressed with the well thought out port layout and positioning. The FDX-i uses Oceanic’s Dry Valve Technology (DVT) preventing water or other foreign objects from entering the first stage, ideal if you forget to put the dust cap on.

Complimenting its modern design, the Omega 3 comes in three colour choices—black, white or clear. Personally I love the clear, as it allows you to see the beautifully engineered internal workings of the second stage. After owning the Omega 3 for over 12 months, I am still blown away by its performance.

*Check with your local dealer that this is standard in your location

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About

Ocean Geographic Explorer (OGX) is a diving adventure resource with a special focus on marine photography and ocean conservation. Our content is divided up into six primary categories: Travel, Sea Science,  Equipment, Photography &Video, Conservation, and Lifestyle. We endeavor be a portal for people with all levels of interest in the marine environment  to learn about and become part of a community of like-minded ocean lovers who enjoy sharing their knowledge of and experiences in our fascinating ocean world.

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